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NNSL Photo/Graphic

Director Mike Jaypoody speaks about his experience making the film Tony: Back from the Brink. To his left is producer Joelie Sanguya, Piksuk Media partner Ole Gjerstad and Tony Kalluk. - Julia Ain Burns photo News LinkRead more
NNSL Photo/Graphic Museum awards best tree
Festival of Trees invites creativity in holiday decorations

Dana Bowen
Northern News Services

THEBACHA/FORT SMITH
Walking into the Northern Life Museum and Cultural Centre this past month may have seemed like a Christmas wonderland with eclectically decorated Christmas trees filling the room. News LinkContinued

See also:
News LinkDocumentary hits hometown
News LinkCalendar shows city spirit
News LinkTrip rerouted
News LinkRoyal treatment for preschool students


Entertainment Notes

E-mail: entertainment@nnsl.com | Monday, December 22, 2014

Craft behind traditional goods higher than price tag

NWT - "Before you put those pair of slippers, mitts, or mukluks back because they are "too expensive", there's something you should know," posted Debbie Boudreau on the Inuvik Buy, Sell Traditional Arts, Crafts Facebook page. The price for hand-made traditional items may be high, but the craft that goes behind it is much higher. Boudreau points out the current market price of traditionally tanned moose hide is $113.28 per square foot while beaver is $180 per skin. It takes six hours to measure, cut and sew together the item, she said. With the cost of materials and labour, Boudreau said the minimum cost of an item adds up to $353.28 just to break even. "Why should we ask our crafters to live on $0?" she wrote.

Stop at the North Pole

HAY RIVER - Children are invited aboard for story time reading of Polar Express Dec. 23. Derry Desmond, NWT Centennial Library's program librarian, is set to read the children's story to a group of children at 6:30 p.m. with cookies and hot chocolate for everyone. The story, written by Chris Van Allsburg, follows a young boy who used to love Christmas. When he hears a whistle blowing outside his house one night, he sees a train called the Polar Express that is heading to the North Pole. People are encouraged to wear pajamas.

Summer event welcomes new tunes

NWT - A chance to rock out at this year's Alianait Arts Festival is running out as the deadline application is Jan. 30 for northern performers. The annual summer concert taking place in Iqaluit features a line up of musicians, inviting people to watch local and international performers. While northern performers have a later date to apply, southern musicians must apply by Jan. 2. Musicians from the North include those from NWT, Nunavut, Yukon, Nunavik and Nunatsiavut or northern parts of the provinces. It also includes artists living in other Northern countries such as Russia, Greenland, Scandinavia and Alaska. All Alianait performers are offered round-trip travel to Iqaluit, accommodation and performances fees.

Whale Cove residents answers whale bone question

NUNAVUT - Nunavut Arts and Crafts Association is yet again hosting the Guess-it-to-win-it contest. Last month's contest asked which natural material artist Alina Tunglik used to create the blade of a decorative ulu, while the answer was baleen - part of a whale's jaw bone. This month's winner is Eloise Noble from Whale Cove. For the holiday season, NACA asks which Nunavut artist created the wall-hanging featured on NACA's 2014 holiday cards. The draw takes place Jan. 15. Go to the NACA website to find out more.

Summer event welcomes new tunes

NUNAVUT - A chance to rock out at this year's Alianait Arts Festival is running out as the deadline application is Jan. 30 for northern performers.
The annual summer concert taking place in Iqaluit features a line-up of musicians, both local and international. While northern performers have a later date to apply, southern musicians must apply by Jan. 2. Musicians from the North include those from Nunavut, NWT, Yukon, Nunavik and Nunatsiavut or northern parts of the provinces. It also includes artists living in other Northern countries such as Russia, Greenland, Scandinavia and Alaska. All Alianait performers are offered round-trip travel to Iqaluit, accommodation and performances fees.

Help needed to conjure mythical story

NUNAVUT - A game company is looking for Nunavummiut to use their knowledge as a way to help develop a game.
A U.S. Developer has created a game around the myth of Qalupalik called Beneath the Floes. The company is about to put it out for free, but has asked for people to try it out and provide feedback. In order to do so, contact the Pangnirtung company Pinnguaq.

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