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NNSL Photo/Graphic

Children's entertainer Kerry Wheler performs at the Mother Goose Caboose children's stage behind the Dancing Moose Cafe on Sunday while Vaida Marrai, 3, left, Lily Marrai, 5, Amelia Predovic, 5, and Mara Predovic, 3, enjoy the music. - Daron Letts/NNSL photo
Families flock to Old Town Ramble and Ride
Small children a big part of ninth annual eco-friendly neighbourhood festival

Daron Letts
Northern News Services
Wednesday, August 5, 2015

SOMBA K'E/YELLOWKNIFE
Tents, stage equipment and chairs set out for this past weekend's ninth annual Old Town Ramble and Ride were still in place on Monday as organizers began plotting for 2016.
"Next year's going to be our 10th anniversary," said Rosalind Mercredi, owner of Down to Earth Gallery and a co-founder of the beloved neighbourhood festival, speaking with Yellowknifer on the morning following the three-day festival. News LinkContinued

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Entertainment Notes

E-mail: entertainment@nnsl.com Monday, August 3, 2015

Double bubble

HAY RIVER - Children were buoyed by bubbles at the NWT Centennial Library in Hay River last month.
About three dozen children frolicked on the lawn and sidewalks as soap bubbles floated above their heads.
"It was tonnes of fun," said Craig Edwards, programming librarian. "Bubble Day is very successful. It's always a great time."
The next Bubble Day at the library is scheduled fro Aug. 22 at 1 p.m.
In the meantime, the library hosts storytime for children aged five to 12 at 10:30 a.m. every Thursday.

Rockers to lead youth workshop

THEBACHA/FORT SMITH - A two-week music workshop for young people is scheduled to begin in Fort Smith today.
The workshop, set to run each weekday from Aug. 3 to 14, is being instructed by Fort Smith musicians Veronica Johnny and Dave Johnny of the music group The Johnnys.
The curriculum includes lessons on how to write music and lyrics to songs. Finished songs will be recorded at the end of the program.
The workshop is open to youth aged 13 to 23 years. The organizers welcome all levels of skill and all musical styles.
The workshop is an initiative of the Youth Rise Project.
- Paul Bickford

Metis artist shares her skill

SOMBA K'E/YELLOWKNIFE - Metis artist Ria Coleman shared her knowledge and talent as a weaver at the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre in Yellowknife last week.
The South Slave textile artist was featured as an artist-in-residence as part of the museum's summer cultural programming.
Coleman led tourists and residents of all ages through the weaving process, allowing participants an opportunity to contribute their labour to mini-sashes she said she may finish as purses, lapel adornments or scarves to help promote Metis heritage and identity.

Arts festival returns for second year

THEBACHA/FORT SMITH - The Summer Splash Arts Festival is set to return to the Northern Life Museum later this week.
The second annual edition of the 10-day festival has expanded to include performance art skill development opportunities and more children's event programming, said Kelsea Donovan, event and program co-ordinator with the museum.
Multiple workshops led by Northern artists and visiting southern artists are on the program, including painting workshops and an exhibition by Sahtu artist Antoine Mountain, pottery workshops by Yellowknife ceramic artist Astrid Kruse and a writers workshop by hometown author Richard Van Camp.
"This year we're partnering with more people and organizations to show off the performance side of the arts," said Donovan.
Members of the Western Arctic Moving Pictures film society are set to host an acting workshop and players with Stuck in a Snowbank Theatre have planned a theatre workshop.
The festival is scheduled to run from Aug. 6 to 16.
On Aug. 15 an arts fair and farmers market is scheduled to run from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. in Mission Historic Park.
Workshop participants can register through the museum's website.

Northern playwrights encouraged to apply

BANFF, ALTA. - There is space for eight Canadian writers in the 2016 Banff Playwrights Colony and Northern bards are encouraged to apply. The program, a partnership between The Banff Centre and The Canada Council for the Arts, offers participants a creative environment in which to write while meeting and collaborating with performing artists from throughout Canada and beyond.
Projects that incorporate interdisciplinary elements are of particular interest to the adjudication committee this year.
The 2016 program is scheduled to run from April 11 to 30 with the possibility of an additional retreat from Feb. 15 to 27.
Application deadline is Sept. 16. For more information, consult the Banff Centre's website.

Ceramic artists prepare to welcome visitors

KANGIQLINIQ/RANKIN INLET - About one dozen artists at Rankin Inlet's Matchbox Gallery have work on display in advance of the upcoming Nunavut Arts Festival scheduled to be held in the community from Aug. 20 to 26. About 50 special guests of the organizing Nunavut Arts and Crafts Association are expected to pass through the community later this month. Matchbox Gallery representative Sandra Nichol said she hopes many of them will stop by to see the ceramic work.
"They will see world class level ceramic sculpting that is done here. It's all one of a kind," she said. "The Matchbox Gallery is the only gallery in the circumpolar region in which indigenous artists work with clay."
Hand-sculpted ceramic art evolved as a medium used among the community's soapstone and bone carvers following the federal government's arts-related economic development programs in the late 1960s and 1970s.
The gallery is welcoming a steady flow of visitors this summer, similar to numbers seen in previous years, according to Nichol.
However, customers are not buying nearly as many pieces as they have in the recent past, she added. "People are not buying art," she said. "Traffic hasn't declined, just the spending."
She said she hopes the visitors to this month's festival buck the trend.

Northern playwrights encouraged to apply

BANFF, ALTA. - There is space for eight Canadian writers in the 2016 Banff Playwrights Colony and Northern bards are encouraged to apply before next month's deadline.
The program, a partnership between The Banff Centre and The Canada Council for the Arts, offers participants a creative environment in which to write while meeting and collaborating with performing artists from throughout Canada and beyond.
Projects that incorporate interdisciplinary elements are of particular interest to the adjudication committee this year.
The 2016 program is scheduled to run from April 11 to 30 with the possibility of an additional retreat from Feb. 15 to 27.
Application deadline is Sept. 16. For more information, consult the Banff Centre's website.

Nunavummiut artists wanted

NUNAVUT - The Northern Lights Arts and Cultural committee is accepting expressions of interest from craft producers and visual and performance artists in anticipation of the Northern Lights 2016 Arts and Cultural Pavilion.
The pavilion is scheduled to be established at the Shaw Centre in Ottawa from Jan. 27 to 30. Deadline for expressions of interest for artists is noon on Sept. 11.
For more information, contact Rowena House, Northern Lights Arts and Cultural Chair.

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