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Eiderdown, which eider ducks use as a nest, is big money, with a king-sized Icelandic eiderdown duvet valued at $10,000 on one website. A duvet costs on average about $6,000 per kilogram of eiderdown used. - photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
New hope for old plant
Sanikiluaq works to reopen eiderdown factory after favourable feasibility study

Forget the nest egg. The nest itself is where the money is in Sanikiluaq, where a feasibility study showed that the hamlet's eiderdown - which the ducks use as a nest and then abandon - is worth reopening a factory shuttered a decade ago.
ARROW Continued

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mine training society


Happenings around Nunavut

Kirt Ejesiak is the Nunavut lead for a project that aims to harness the energy found in the moving tides of Frobisher Bay. Wave of the future
NUNAVUT NEWS NORTH - With one of the world's highest tidal variations, Iqaluit is a prime location for harnessing and developing technology that could reduce the territory's reliance on diesel-generated energy. Apex entrepreneur Kirt Ejesiak, with three Western Arctic partners, is hoping turbines installed on the sea floor can harness tidal energy to replace diesel as the capital's energy source.

Rosemarie Kuptana, indigenous Nunavut leader and negotiator for Inuit land rights, speaks about experiences she's had being the only woman at the negotiating table, during the Dene Nahjo Indigenous Circumpolar Women's Gathering at the Prince of Wales Heritage Centre in Yellowknife Nov. 12. Leader recalls clash with PM
NUNAVUT NEWS NORTH - A gathering is giving attendees a look into the experience of female indigenous leaders, among them the then-head of a national Inuit group who explained how she made the prime minister apologize. It was 1992, and former prime minister Brian Mulroney had come to the table with Canada's premiers, representatives from the Assembly of First Nations, the Native Council of Canada, the Inuit Tapirisat of Canada, now known as the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, and the Metis Council of Canada.

Iqaluit Huskies player Jaymi Kakee, left, battles for the ball against Cape Dorset Predators player Ian Qaumagiuq in an indoor soccer tournament held in the territory last year.

New game in town
NUNAVUT NEWS NORTH - Athletes and coaches across the territory are preparing themselves in the game of futsal, which is set to replace indoor soccer at the 2016 Arctic Winter Games. Futsal is considered by many to be a cousin to the popular sport of soccer. It is sanctioned by the Federation International Football Association (FIFA), and it is played across the globe. It is essentially an indoor version of the familiar outdoor game, with some minor differences.

William (Bill) Lyall tells the story of the co-op movement in Nunavut through the book, Helping Ourselves by Helping Each Other. The author is president of the Ikaluktutiak Co-op in Cambridge Bay.

Politician speaks on co-op movement
NUNAVUT NEWS NORTH - As president of the Ikaluktutiak Co-op since 1978, William (Bill) Lyall's career provides the basis for his first book. Helping Ourselves by Helping Each Other: the Life Story of William Lyall tells of the politician's life as well as a story of the co-op movement. Lyall wrote the book in collaboration with the Nunavut Research Institute, Quebec City's Laval University, Arctic Co-operatives Limited and the Nunavut Department of Education.



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