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The Housemen are among the Yellowknife musical acts unable to perform live due to the Covid-19 pandemic, but the three stay-at-home-dads are prepping audiences for the day they can make them jump and dance again.

The band, composed of lead singer and guitarist Jeff Sleno, bassist Allan Yeoman and drummer Trevor Sinclair, released its newest single called Fake and Coloured Lies on Jan. 15.

Although an acoustic rock band, The Housemen’s latest single has “a rural country vibe,” which features Wesley Hardisty on fiddle and which is recorded and mixed by Diga’s Naka Productions.

Over the last two years, and since the band’s inception on Jan. 1 2019, they have performed at nearly every major festival in the NWT. Among them have included the Long John Jamboree, the Snow King’s Winter Festival, Festival on Franklin, Hay Days, YK Rocks Jam Night and Hockey Day in Canada.

“All except Folk on the Rocks,” they said almost in unison during a recent interview.

The Housemen are getting ready to release recorded acoustic rock tunes leading up to a day when they can perform them live. The band dropped its first single of the year on Jan. 15. From left, Jeff Sleno, lead singer and guitarist; Trevor Sinclair, drummer; and bassist Allan Yeoman.
photo courtesy of The Housemen

The band admitted that it has been a challenging past year since they have not been able to play live. However, they have tried to look on the bright side, including with the knowledge that many artists across the country are in the same situation.

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“On the upside though, it does get us in a position where we can get the album out there and if the GNWT and vaccine keeps rolling out we will be in a better position to perform this summer,” Sinclair said.

Their plan is that after the release of the single, they will be able to release a six-track EP in February called Tin Boat.

A month after that, another six-track EP – titled Family Man – is expected to be ready in the spring.

The idea is to keep the band’s work in the minds of audiences by giving a little bit of material at a time.

“Since we don’t have (the ability to tour and promote the album) we have broken up (our recordings) to market our music and draw attention and then market again and get more opportunity while not being able to tour,” Sleno said.

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